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Two Days and a Quarter of a Century – the inspiration for the 2019 AGA President’s Symposium

  About the author: Dr. Maria E. Orive received her PhD from the University of California, Berkeley, and is currently Professor and Chair of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Kansas. While at KU, she spent one year as a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University. Dr. Orive’s research in […]

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Using genetics to conserve life history strategies in California steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

About the author: Dr. Alexandra DeCandia is a postdoctoral fellow at Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute. Her research applies diverse molecular techniques to wildlife conservation and disease management of North American mammals. Alexandra received her Ph.D. from Princeton University in 2020 and her B.A. from Columbia University in 2015. For her career, she […]

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Presidential symposium contributors speak on the present and future of Indirect Genetic Effects

  About the author: Sarah McPeek is a PhD candidate with Dr. Butch Brodie at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, VA. Her research focuses on the evolution of behavioral interactions among nectar-producing woodland wildflowers and nectar-foraging beetles at Mountain Lake Biological Station. She previously earned her bachelor of the arts at Kenyon College in […]

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What role do pedigrees play in the preservation of the Galapagos giant tortoise?

About the author: Angie Bradley wrote this post as part of Dr. Stacy Krueger-Hadfield‘s Principles of Scientific Investigation course. Angie is a student in the Accelerated Bachelor’s/Master’s of Biology Program at UAB. In her time at university, Angie has become passionate about genetics, aging, and molecular biology. She hopes to one day attend dental school and […]

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What happens when hunting history, whale culture, genetics, and an international collaboration work towards a common goal?

Right whales were given their name because they were the rightwhales to hunt: they swim slowly near the ocean’s surface and make predictable annual migrations to easily accessible bays along the coast. They were hunted to near extinction before international protections were enacted in 1935. As the species recovered, researchers have acquired a myriad of […]

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